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See It This Week

‘Rainbow Time’ at NWFF, ‘Fucking A’ at UW, Industrial Revelation + the True Loves Launch City Arts’ Band Crush

'Rainbow Time'

Monday, Nov. 28 – Wednesday, Nov. 30
Philip Kaufman’s directorial resume brims with enough truly great movies (The Unbearable Lightness of Being and The Right Stuff, among them) to make anything he’s touched worth seeing. His 1979 dramedy The Wanderers made few ripples upon its original release, but it’s a legit overlooked jewel-a sharp and affecting observation of America in transition, filtered through the fates of a bunch of early ‘60s gang members. –Tony Kay
Northwest Film Forum

Tuesday, Nov. 29 – Sunday, Dec. 4
Fucking A is one of Suzan-Lori Parks’ riffs on Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter, but this time Hester’s “A” stands for “abortionist” instead of “adulterer.” Her son is in jail, and Hester, certain that he’s been wrongly imprisoned, has devoted her life to freeing him. Fucking A is more dark fable than straight play, full of music and dance, Brecht and Weill, set in “a small town in a small country in the middle of nowhere.” Malika Oyetimein, a City Arts 2016 Future Lister, directs. Fucking A runs through Dec. 11. –Gemma Wilson
UW Meany Studio Theatre

Opening Thursday, Dec. 1
Two years after transforming the vacant third floor of King Street Station into a thriving arts center, Greg Lundgren hands over the keys the Office of Arts & Culture in 2017. Never one to go out quietly, before the Office commences building out the space to house employees and create new meeting spaces for local artists, Lundgren is staging a final blowout exhibit with his collaborative group, PDL (including Jason Puccinelli, Jed Dunkerley and Lundgren). Riffing on the function of the Office of Arts & Culture, PDL’s mock Bureau of Arts & Culture promises to provide some not-so-mock solutions to some of our city’s current problems. The 21 proposals proffered as part of the exhibit—including possible alterations on the waterfront, the downtown corridor, Harbor Island and even the zoo—are a token of “faith in a better city” instead of the too-common hue and cry triggered by the recent growth that’s jaded many of Seattle’s long-term artists. –Amanda Manitach
King Street Station

Thursday, Dec. 1
2014 Future Lister and erstwhile Seattleite Linas Phillips makes films that test the limits of your compassion with frustratingly eccentric characters. In Rainbow Time he plays Shonzi, a developmentally challenged 40-year-old horndog who blackmails his younger brother with a sex tape from their past. It’s a challenging, funny, taboo-trampling comedy with sparkling performances from writer-director Phillips plus Melanie Lynskey, Timm Sharp, Tobin Bell, Jay Duplass and Lauren Weedman. –Brett Hamil
Northwest Film Forum

Friday, Dec. 2
No big deal: Saxophonist Kamasi Washington is widely credited for nothing less than keeping jazz relevant in the modern era. The 35-year-old, LA-born-and-bred musician believes in his mission as much as anyone, giving his albums heavyweight titles like The Proclamation, Light of the World and, most recently, The Epic, his double-LP for Brainfeeder Records. It was the latter that rocketed Washington to iconic status and brought him into the orbit the world’s most progressive musicians of any genre, including rapper Kendrick Lamar, bassist Thundercat and producer Flying Lotus. His concerts bring a dozen musicians on-stage—including his sax-playing father—in a righteous celebration of jazz, funk and soul. –JZ
Moore Theatre

Saturday, Dec. 3
After spending most of our adult lives attending countless music festivals across the country, we learned that that the best live-music moments are generally unscripted and collaborative. Moments when, due to inspiration or inebriation or simple proximity, likeminded artists find themselves sharing a stage with each other in some sort of spontaneous, never-to-be-repeated showing of mutual admiration. With those moments in mind, City Arts is thrilled to launch Band Crush, our brand-new concert series wherein one local act chooses another to share a bill and a stage with. For our first event, we looked to none other than Industrial Revelation, who we’ve often cited as the best band in Seattle, and their homies in the True Loves, the vintage soul band comprised of some of the city’s most dedicated players. The Band Crush format is loose; besides pairing the bands, all we know, according to our recent interview with the True Loves, is the bands will cover each other’s songs and at some point appear on-stage in some kinda group-love free-for-all. (Also, rumor has it that guest vocalists will be involved). Basically, this show will be unlike any other in either band’s history, and if that sounds interesting to you, then you should be there. –Jonathan Zwickel
Piranha Shop

Saturday, Dec. 3
The eddying atmosphere of shoegazer music makes an incomparable soundtrack for fall, so local shoegaze/psych-rock festival Popnoise Fest NW couldn’t be more welcome. Seven bands, most from Seattle, will be getting their swirl on. Turn on, tune in, etc. –Tony Kay
Lo-Fi

Saturday, Dec. 3
Composer Phil Kline’s Unsilent Night is a a magical holiday(ish) event and a super-rad blend of tech and IRL community. The evening works thusly: download the free Unsilent Night app (or some free music tracks, whichever you prefer), show up at On the Boards at 6 p.m., then press play in unison and march around the neighborhood “caroling” (non-denominationally) en masse. Fun? Fun. –Gemma Wilson
On the Boards

Saturday, Dec. 3
Descend into the underground on a flume of minimal techno and vintage synthwave with Veronica Vasicka, one of the world’s foremost purveyors of dark, stark and addictive dance music. As co-founder and DJ for New York’s East Village Radio and founder of Minimal Wave Records, Vasicka has long dwelled on the outer edges of electronic music, unearthing hard-to-find recordings from obscure European artists and bringing them to attentive audiences around the world—including, tonight, Seattle, where she’s sure to bring down the house at Kremwerk. –JZ
Kremwerk

Saturday, Dec. 3
The worthiness of the cause correlates to the quality of tonight’s lineup at SMOOCH, wherein a handful of excellent local and local-affiliated musicians take the Showbox stage to benefit Seattle Children’s Hospital. The event is packed with talent: Father Johnn Misty’s hyperintellectual songmanship, the New Pornographers’ powerhouse indie rock, J Mascis’ guitar heroics and Naked Giants’ youthful exuberance. This is simply one of the best bills we’ve seen all year. And if the cost of admission is steep, know all the money—and we mean all, as each artist is donating their time—goes to a good cause. –JZ
Showbox

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