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Letters from our readers

Estimable Museum Builder I checked my mail on campus last night and, to my delight, discovered Bond Huberman’s interview with that grand lady of Seattle arts, Barbara Thomas (“Instructions Not Included,” August). Thank you for City Arts....

Estimable Museum Builder

I checked my mail on campus last night and, to my delight, discovered Bond Huberman’s interview with that grand lady of Seattle arts, Barbara Thomas (“Instructions Not Included,” August). Thank you for City Arts. Barbara is just the best thing since the Internet, isn’t she? A terrific painter (one of her paintings hangs proudly in my living room) and a person with a heart as big as all outdoors. I love that cover article.   

— Charles Johnson, Seattle

The writer is an author and professor [emeritus] of creative writing at the UW.

 

Note to Our Copyeditor

Here are two more, similar to the problem with “I could care less” (City Seen, August). “Walking on eggshells”: There would be no problem with walking on eggshells. They are already broken and walking on them would do no damage. The correct expression is “walking on eggs,” meaning you have to be so careful it is like walking on eggs while trying not to break them. The other one is: people saying “I cease to be amazed” when they mean “I never cease to be amazed.” And has it become a fad or am I painfully old-fashioned when it annoys me to hear folks say “me and my wife” or “me and my brother”?

— Shirley Luxem, Issaquah
Our copyeditor replies: “I cease to be amazed” is very similar to the mistake I described. Of course, I ceased to be amazed by such lapses a long time ago.

Whither Bike Safety?

With Critical Mass’s contempt for safety, endorsed by Adriana Grant (“Anarchy on Two Wheels,” August) — led by their inclusion of non-helmeted bikers, followed by drinking liquor (passing “a flask or two”) while riding and “an illicit thrill in sailing straight through a red light” — CM has as much moral ground to roll on as vehicular drivers who show contempt for bicyclists by pushing them off the road or throwing cans and bottles at them. City Arts readers who prefer to hear fewer news reports about bicyclists being killed or maimed in vehicular-bike accidents will press the Seattle City Council and mayor to legislate a many-years-overdue mandatory bike helmet law.

— Akiva Kenny Segan, Seattle

 

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