Recent Articles

Review

Pinter Festival Offers Hard Perfection

Whoever said that nothing good comes of bad behavior was wrong. The pair of plays by Harold Pinter that open this summer’s Pinter Festival at ACT’s Falls Theatre are full of self-interested loutishness, but the dramatic result produced by this...
Review

‘Romeo and Juliet’ Is Ferocious and Flawed

Amid this cool and drizzly Seattle summer, the vaguely North African setting of Romeo and Juliet in the Intiman Theatre Festival suggests plenty of heat. Clad in desert white, the fiery occupants of Verona’s bazaar ignite Shakespeare’s tragedy...
Review

Powerful “A Train” Keeps On Track

“Jesus Hopped the A Train,” the second effort by promising company Azeotrope, is a tough play. Not only difficult – which it is, not just to perform, but sometimes to watch—but resilient, full of muscle and sinew, and hard to pierce. But the...
Review

Lewis Black’s “One Slight Hitch” Has Cold Feet

Lewis Black is known less as a playwrite than for his stand-up comedy and commentary on The Daily Show, delivered with caustic firepower that flouts all conventions of good manners to tell the truth as he sees it. So why has he written such a...
Theatre

‘Damn Yankees’ Winningly Throws no Curves

Sometimes a straight pitch works best. The loving embrace of the original 1950s style that governs the production of Damn Yankees now running at the 5th Avenue Theatre allows this splendid cast to hit it solidly over the fence. The 1955 musical was...
Theatre

‘Pitmen Painters’ Offers Fine Strokes

What is art and its meaning is the sort of subject that, our prejudices tell us, isn’t expected to be discussed with working-class brogues. That’s the bias that The Pitmen Painters, now running at ACT’s Allen Theater, confronts. Lee Hall’s...
Uncategorized

Theatre Review: First Date Makes a Poor Impression

First impressions, First Date suggests, can be misleading. Sometimes—but usually those initial assessments turn out to be right. So it is for this world premiere musical playing at ACT’s Falls Theatre, ACT's latest co-production with the Fifth...
Theatre

“Little Voice” Has a Big Heart

She’s got a ticket to ride, or so she thinks. In The Rise and Fall of Little Voice, delightfully staged at ArtsWest, aging good-time gal Mari Hoff thinks she has found her savior in a pub-crawling hustler named Ray Say. Eager for her last chance...
Theatre

Priaire Nocturne Raises Many Musical Spirits

Montana of the 1920s may be the land of wide open spaces, but in Book-It Repertory’s reverent and moving adaptation of Ivan Doig’s novel, Prairie Nocturne, the prairie town is crowded with ghosts. For singing teacher Susan Duff (eloquently played...
Theatre

Nothing New in “How to Write a New Book for the Bible”

“The Bible is a story,” Bill Cain tells us in his onstage persona, “a story of a family.” That may be, but not all family stories are biblical in scope. The rejoinder is obvious, but this earnest meditation on family dynamics amid parental...
Theatre

“Coriolanus” is Rome for the XCIX Percent.

Shakespeare’s late work, Coriolanus is seldom read, much less staged, as Seattle Shakespeare Company has now done. Once seen, however—especially in this brilliant rendition—you can’t help but wonder why. The story of the arrogance of power is...
Music

“Wisemen” Lampoons Without Limit

Is nothing sacred? In Rosenstock Productions’ cabaret send-up of the nativity story, “Wisemen,” not really. For the three-man Hasidic law firm of Goldberg, Frankenstein and Murray, the Torah is a wealth of civil suits, and the “litigators of...