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"Jerry Korb is an award-winning multimedia artist who no longer feels any connection to his commercially lucrative work."

Jerry Korb, visual artist
Jerry Korb is an award-winning multimedia artist who no longer feels any connection to his commercially lucrative work. It’s become so effete and over-intellectualized that he has a hard time mustering any goddamn passion for it anymore. His current show was inspired by the only source of excitement left in his life: his studio assistant Ginny, who crackles with vitality and raw sex but treats him like a slightly amusing, bald little impotent monkey-man. Korb dreams of divorcing his wife, writing his kids out of his will and moving to the Florida Keys with Ginny, where they’ll open up a little tourist gift shop on the beach and make those driftwood sculptures of boats you see in timeshare condos.

Tanjolo Bliss, singer
Friends and family back in Pocatello remember her as Becky Larsen, star soprano of the Idaho Mormon Youth Choir, but in Seattle she’s Tanjolo Bliss, a hard-drinking, world-weary, pink-haired chanteuse hell-bent on smashing the patriarchy. Bliss is the frontwoman of punk band Garbage Slut, who just self-released their debut cassingle, “Let’s Do Dabs and Fuck in a Dumpster.” By day she works as a nanny.

Grace Bergram, poet
Grace Bergram is a critically acclaimed poet whose last volume, Homage to Formaggio, was shortlisted for the prestigious MacGregor Award and sold a total of 17 copies. Her debut chapbook, An End to It All, was hailed by the New Yorker as “an eloquent and unblinking examination of loss” and netted her $115 over the past decade. She lives with her wife, Tammy, a corporate tax lawyer whose unwavering emotional and financial support Bergram has grown to resent.

Sherman Woodruff, screenwriter
If you could risk it all for true love, would you? That’s the question posed by Sherman Woodruff’s as-yet-unwritten debut screenplay, a coming-of-age indie drama set in suburban New Hampshire in the late 1990s. Woodruff conceived the story when his girlfriend dumped him in his sophomore year of college, and though he’s worked as an IT consultant for the past decade, he introduces himself as a screenwriter on the strength of the prospective script’s explosive emotional dynamics and crisply executed storyline. After writing and selling the screenplay, Woodruff plans to direct the semi-autobiographical film, which he says will be reminiscent of the Coen brothers, Wes Anderson and Noah Baumbach. The emergence of this 38-year-old undiscovered powerhouse auteur is just around the corner. Yesterday on his lunch break he Googled “free screenwriting software.”

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