Margo Vansynghel has been a writer as long as she can remember. Even before straying from the Belgian seaside (where she was born) to pursue degrees in Art History and Journalism, she worked as a newspaper and magazine journalist and critic, and still does today. When she’s not writing, reading or seeking refuge in museums and galleries, you can find her behind a camera, shouting at heedless car drivers from her bike or documenting conditions in homeless camps.

Recent Articles


Lisa Myers Bulmash and “Saint Felicia” at NAAM

In her first solo museum show, 'You’re Not From Around Here, Are You?,' the mixed-media and collage artist manipulates personal ephemera to to center African American faces.

Tlingit-American Artist Alison Marks Navigates Two Cultures

Her first solo museum exhibit, 'One Gray Hair,' is on view at the Frye Art Museum Nov. 11 through Feb. 4, 2018.

Images and Poetry Combine in an Exploration of Identity at the Alice

'/what are we but lying single surface/,' is a compact but exciting group show featuring paintings, videos, photos, collage and text, along with a series of readings.

Marina Fini Creates a Magical World at Mount Analogue

The self-described “cyber fairy hippie” exhibits her latest installation, 'Clean Rooms. Low Rates,' this month.

Reinventing Home

Christopher Paul Jordan is the Northwest’s newest art star.

Andrew Wyeth: In Retrospect at SAM

The popular American painter was inextricably ensconced in his stark surroundings.

Self-Care in the Gallery: Mystical Orchid at Hedreen

Faux-guru artists Mystical Orchid offer a guide to surrealist self-care.

John Criscitello is Re-queering Rock ‘n’ Roll

His new solo show, 'In Code' opens next week at Gallery4Culture, featuring images of rock stars re-imagined as homoerotic characters.

Transforming Yourself in the Gallery

Storme Webber's history is personal and provocative at the Frye.

‘BorderLands’ at King Street Station

An installation on the border of allegiance and resistance.

‘Out of Sight’ Is Big, Beautiful and Bright

In its third year, the survey of contemporary Pacific Northwest art radiates a lust for life.